September, 2018

Epilepsy Awareness for Purple Day

Epilepsy in focus: Local resident Tania Leadbitter is advocating for awareness and understanding of epilepsy. Photo: Shannon Wood. Local resident Tania Leadbitteris raising awareness for Epilepsy in conjunction with Epilepsy Awareness month and Purple Day on March 26.
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After a recent seizure she suffered in public left her helpless on the side of the road, Ms Leadbitter decided to advocate for awareness in the community for people to better understand the condition.

Ms Leadbitter, who does not usually go out alone in public due to her epilepsy, decided to walk to a friends house on a Friday morning last month.

The next thing she knew, she had collapsed andfound herself suffering from a lengthy seizureon the side of the road.

“I don’t usually walk anywhere, I just happened to be walking across the road at that time, unluckily,” she said.

“I don’t have the type of seizure where you lay on the ground and shake, I just blank out.

“People think of epilepsy as being on the ground shaking, when that’s not always the case.”

A friend of Ms Leadbitter, who did not wish to be named, happened to be driving past during the incident and witnessed several people driving past without offering assistance to Ms Leadbitter.

“As I came along to where Wallsend Street splits into two, Tania was sitting on the road side.

A lady backed out of the driveway a bit further up and had a good look at herand then drove away,” he said. “About four cars actually slowed down and went around her.

Then when I pulled up on the kerb to talk to her and try and get her in the caranother few cars slowed down and went through, no one stopped to see if she was alright.

“I realise a lot of people are worried now, with all the drug addicts and things like that, but you can stop and wind your window down and ask if someone is alright.”

Ms Leadbitter, who has lived in Collie for 30 years, said people should be more caring when it comes to strangers and asking if they need help.

“I just want people to be more aware, I wasn’t a drug addict lying on the road,” she said.

Ms Leadbitter is currently on a waiting list for an operation that could potentially cure her epilepsy.

For more information about Epilepsy Awareness month go toepilepsyaustralia.net.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
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‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
Nanjing Night Net

‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

A winning summer for reading

Back row, from left: Vicki Edmunds (Blue Mountains Library Manager), Sophie Connor, Jacinta Hanemann, Deputy Mayor Cr Chris Van Der Kley, Cr Romola Hollywood, Annie Sharkey and Alan Crooks (Turning Page Bookshop). Front row, from left: Heidi Hanemann, Thomas Hanemann, Natasha Thompson, and Abigail Dickens.The Blue Mountains’ keenest readers were announced this week following the end of the Blue Mountains Library Summer Reading Challenge for 2016/17.
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This year’s challenge saw an impressive 563 childrenparticipate, reading 11,220 books.

Deputy mayor Chris Van der Kley and Cr Romola Hollywood took delight in giving prizesto four keen winners: best junior reader – Abigail Dickens; best teen reader – Sophie Connor; encouragement award – Natasha Thompson; and best family readeraward – the Hanemann Family.

Blue Mountains branch libraries wereinundated in the last twomonths with children and teenagers borrowing books consistently. Library staff enjoyed the excitement as childrenreturned log sheets in exchange for book vouchers redeemable from The Turning Page Bookshop in Springwood and Megalong Books in Leura.

Cr Van ker Kleysaid the Blue Mountains Library continues to create an exciting environment for children, “helping to instil the habit of reading and a thirst for knowledge which makes children open to new ideas throughout their lives”.

Over the past nineyears the program has seen 80,130 books borrowed for the Summer Reading Challenge with 4467 children participating.

Cr Romola Hollywood said:“I congratulate all the children and young people who took part in the Summer Reading Challenge. As the Vice-President (Metropolitan) of the NSW Public Libraries Association, this program is a terrific example of how our council libraries provide opportunities for all community members, including our youngest citizens, toexperience the benefits and joys of reading.

“If the statistics from this program areanything to go by, support for our public libraries has a strong future.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Col’s eye-catching van

ARTY: Bus owner Col Ward watches as artist Lisa Wiseman puts the finishing touches on the artwork.Col Ward always wanted a tiger painted on the door of his motorhome andnow he has a whole African jungle travelling along with him.
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His Toyota Coaster bus isa moving work of art, emblazoned with around 50 animals including big cats, elephants, antelopes, crocodiles, a giraffe, a rhinoceros,penguins, turtles, meerkats anda bat colony.

The work has created a steady flow of interest from passersby driving past Col’s Eloiza Street with the bus parked out the front.

Local residents have been charting the progress of Dungog artistLisa Wiseman who has been lovingly labouring on the project for the past 11 months.

Col said he had been chasing a man to do the tiger painting on the door for some time before a friend mentioned Lisa who was also Col’s friend and operates her studio Cerublu from Dowling Street.

Lisa is no stranger to designing artwork on vehicles, having worked on a number of caravans and cars.

“I think Lisa thoughtit would be a nice simple little job and then it just went on from the tiger,” laughed Col.

“It’s just spectacular.

“I’m so happy with it.”

Lisa said she and Col would discuss each stage during the project of transforming the chocolate brown bus.

“The weather has been a bit difficult at times so I went sometimes for weeks being able to paint but other days Idid four days a week,” said Lisa.

“I’ve nicknamed it the Sistine Catbus as I’ve spent so much time up on trestles and I don’t really like being up in the air.”

While Col and Lisa have almost lost count of the menagerie on the bus, there are 19 big cats alone on the exterior and another four painted inside, including a snow tiger on the refrigerator.

Each scene is its own story and the more you look at the bus the more animals you see.

Each of the cats’ eyes follow you when you move.

“The eyes of the cats have been painted in gold leaf so they shine off the car lights so it is pretty impressive at night, with the driver behind me having a catstaring at them,” said Col.

Col plans to travel in his newly completed work of art and is keen to see the impressions from other travelers.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.