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Rosellas’ final chance

WICKETS: Toronto paceman Andrew Sommerville will be hoping to make early inroads against Wests at Ron Hill Oval on Saturday and secure a Newcastle District Cricket Association semi-final spot. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers.Wests will be without NSW Country all-rounder Joe Price as they continue to both chase down Toronto at RonHill Oval on Saturday and keep their Newcastle District Cricket Association finals aspirations alive for 2016-2017.
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Price (61 not out) has Bush Blues commitments in Bowral this weekend and won’t be able to resume his innings for the Rosellas (1-82), who require another 101 runs with nine wickets in hand to claim first innings points against the Kookaburras (182).

Insteadhe will be replaced in the first XI by Stewart Morgan, more than likely joining Ben Woolmer (1 not out) out in the middle straight away, with Wests needing a win to have any chance of making the top four this season.

The Rosellas (48 points) sit in sixth spot and are nine points adrift of the play-off mark midway through the penultimate round while the third-placed Kookaburras (58) can all but assure themselves a shot at the title with victory on day two.

Griffin Lea has the one wicket for Toronto so far with Andrew Somerville, Corey Piccirillo and Adrian Chad also sending down a few overs before lightning stopped play last weekend.

James King is next into bat for Wests, who are also without Aaron Wivell.

Elsewhere, five-time defending champions Merewether (6-168) will be on the hunt for an outright result as Troy Goodwin (89 not out) looks to notch up a century and extend the Lions’ 56-run lead over Charlestown (112) at Townson Oval in the five-versus-seven battle.

Down at Cahill Oval and Belmont (125) can wrap up the minor premiership if they can take the seven Newcastle City (3-59) wickets required before the visitors add another 67 runs to their overnight total.

Hamilton-Wickhamand University are both poised to capitalise on strong positions against Wallsend and Cardiff-Boolaroo respectively.

Second-placed Hamwicks (242) hold a 202-run lead over the Tigers (4-40) at No.1 Sportsground whilethe fourth-placed Students (2-57) need just 39 more runs to beat visiting Cardiff (95).

And it will be a one-dayerbetween Stockton-Raymond Terrace and Waratah-Mayfield at Lynn Oval after last week’s wash out.

AROUND THE GROUNDS

Townson Oval: Charlestown 112 v Merewether 6-168

University Oval: Cardiff-Boolaroo 95 v University 2-57

Ron Hill Oval: Toronto 182 v Wests 1-82

Cahill Oval: Belmont 125 v Newcastle City 3-59

No.1 Sportsground: Hamilton-Wickham 242 v Wallsend 4-40

Lynn Oval: Stockton-Raymond Terrace v Waratah-Mayfield (one-dayer)

State refuses to front Senate inquiry into dead fauna at Roe 8 site

Witness photograph Photo: Supplied A dead owl witnesses said was found at the site. Photo: Supplied
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Some of the alleged breaches. A link to full text and documentation of alleged breaches is at https://tinyurl南京夜网/jp34dg7 Photo: Emma Young

WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES

Bureaucrats flown from Canberra for a snap Senate inquiry into alleged environmental breaches at the Roe 8 project site in Coolbellup continued to resist requests to make fauna survey results public.

Community members and scientists fronted the inquiry with an extensive range of photographs and other records of dead and injured birds and animals taken from the site over the past three months of clearing.

They provided extensive documentation of alleged breaches of state and federal environmental conditions.

One condition says an area’s traps must be free of bandicoots for two days before bulldozing, with witnesses providing extensive records they said showed bandicoots being removed hours before clearing commenced.

There was also a continuing failure to install animal-proof mesh on fences to prevent animals entering areas about to be cleared, witnesses told the inquiry.

Greens Senator Scott Ludlam said these reports had received no response from the state office of the Environmental Protection Authority or Environment Minister Albert Jacob.

He said federal Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg last week also failed to respond and had for some weeks failed to comply with a Senate order to table the results of black cockatoo surveys, sparking the inquiry.

Minister Frydenberg’s departmental staff told Senator Ludlam in the hearing that the Minister had consulted his staff before deciding not to hand over the documents.

The federal government is obliged to oversee the project because the site is home to nationally protected endangered species, including black cockatoos, two species of orchid and a native flowering herb with only 200 specimens remaining in the wild.

Banksia woodland, which provides food for black cockatoos, is also nationally protected – but its endangered listing occurred soon after the project was referred to the federal government.

This meant public servants were obliged to proceed as though the woodlands were not endangered when setting their conditions, the inquiry heard.

Compliance and enforcement assistant secretary Monica Collins said the department had received a “large number” of allegations of environmental breaches of matters under federal jurisdiction.

Trained auditors qualified to do the job had been flown in from Canberra to investigate.

Those so far investigated had not been substantiated, apart from one minor matter in which Main Roads WA had failed to produce reports on time and had now been warned.

“We have other allegations that we are still considering,” she said.

“We take our responsibilities seriously.”

The departmental staff told the inquiry that a staffer for contractor AECOM was tasked with checking for potential black cockatoo nesting hollows and had found 26 trees with hollows.

They could confirm none of these had yet been felled but could not confirm AECOM’s method of checking for nesting birds in the hollows or promise to release the survey results.

“They are asking us to believe that they sent a team through a five-kilometre stretch of bushland,” Senator Ludlam said.

“Given the number of people on the site it is amazing that none of the volunteers saw it.

“This inquiry was triggered by us saying if you don’t hand this information over by a certain date we will hold an inquiry.

“Now miraculously they have not been able to bring the documents.”

The alleged breaches of the environmental conditions regarding the dead southern brown bandicoots were not under federal jurisdiction, the staff said, but were the affair of the state.

The state declined to attend the hearing to respond to the allegations, despite invitations issued to Environment Minister Albert Jacob and representatives of the Environmental Protection Authority, proponent Main Roads WA and its contractors and subcontractors.

WA professor Richard Hobbs, part of the Beeliar Group association of WA scientists formed late last year over concerns about the environmental management process, told the panel the breaches were “obvious and persistent”.

He said the fauna management plan complied with standard practice with bandicoots, but was poor in relation to reptile trapping.

“These animals are cryptic and hard to trap effectively so the plan does not allow sufficient time,” he said.

“Also it did not include turtles which were identified afterwards and again the trapping period was way too short.

“It’s all to do with the speed of the process, the rush of trying to get this happening [before the election] that makes the implementation of the plan so difficult.

“Overall, the fauna specialists have had a tough job to do here and some at least are doing their best. But there are many problems.”

He pointed out the Fauna Management Plan was completed only days before work began and was not made available to the public until after work had begun.

“The south west of WA is one of the declared biodiversity hotspots in the world with a huge diversity of flora and fauna found nowhere else in the world,” he said.

“The Beeliar Wetland is one of the jewels in that crown, not just because of its biology, but because of its location in the middle of the city – its social value is huge. That is why you are getting such an emotive response.”

A colleague, UWA professor John Bailey, described Beeliar Regional Park as the Kings Park of southern Perth.

“No one would dream of bulldozing Kings Park,” he said.

A strip of land about 25 metres wide and 4.5 kilometres long has been bulldozed, say protesters, and though there are substantial areas of bushland still waiting to be cleared work is progressing fast.

The senate committee, which includes Labor, Greens and Liberal senators, is due to make its report on March 6.

This will be just five days before the state election that will decide whether the project continues under a Liberal government or ceases under Labor, which has promised to spend the money on other congestion-relieving measures.

A Department of Energy spokesman said the Department of the Environment and Energy had requested information from the state EPA office more than a week ago and could not respond to the Senate until it received this information.

A spokeswoman for Minister Jacob said the allegations were unfounded.

“The Roe Highway extension is being constructed in accordance with the approved conditions and management plans.  The Office of the Environmental Protection Authority has independent auditors on site daily when work is underway to monitor compliance with conditions.  All allegations have been examined and there have been no incidences of non-compliance to date,” she said.

Dean Roberts, spokesman for Main Roads WA, said all work undertaken to date has complied fully with environmental conditions.

“Compliance has been verified by the Office of the Environmental Protection Authority, which continues to monitor work at the site therefore it was not considered necessary for any State Government employees to attend such a public hearing at this time,” he said.  Follow WAtoday on Twitter

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Fun run launch for a legacy

Running aid: Wagga Takes 2 participant Peter Adams with Annette St Clair announce the launch of Lap the Lake in support of the Amie St Clair Melanoma Trust. Picture: Laura Hardwick
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One Wagga man is using everything from his feet to his voiceto chasesupport forthe renowned Amie St Clair Melanoma Trust.

In addition to his participation at this year’s Wagga Takes 2, Peter Adams is launching the trust’s first annual fun run this month.

Theinaugural event aims to raise awareness for the killer disease that claimed the life of twenty-three year old Amie St Clair in 2009.

Mr Adams said money raised would also provideassistance to those undergoing treatment across the Riverina.

Lap the Lake will hit the startline on Sunday, March 12 andparticipants areinvited to walk or run either five or ten kilometres aroundLake Albert.

Mr Adams saidthe charity was close to his heart and encouraged Wagga families and individuals of all ages and abilitiesto sign up.

“The great thing is all the money raised stays in the region,” Mr Adams said.

“We have a free melanoma nurse who supports patients and famlies going through treatment.”

When Peter and Annette St Clair lost their daughter to melanoma in 2009, they never imagined they would receive such overwhelming support.

Her legacy: The late Amie St Clair with her father Peter and mother Annette St Clair, before the twenty-three-year old lost her cancer battle in 2009.

Mrs St Clair said her heart was warmed after Mr Adamsapproached her to raise money for the namesake charity.

“It’s just another form of wonderful support,” Mrs St Clair said.

“The amount of support our little charity got from this community …it justgives you that warm, fuzzy feeling.”

Visit the Amie St Clair Melanoma Trust or Wagga Takes 2 websites and Facebook pages to register.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Schools and universities charged millions for things that are free

School children work off a computer at Darlington Public School. Photo: Louise KennerleyAustralian schools pay $9 million each year to display web pages that are available freely on the internet. They are even charged for displaying thumbnail images of book covers on their school intranet sites.
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They and other institutions pay another $11 million each year to collection agencies for the display of works whose authors can’t be found, which the agencies then pool and distribute to members who weren’t the authors.

Addressing a copyright forum at the National Library on Friday, the co-chair of the Productivity Commission’s intellectual property inquiry, Karen Chester, said she regarded her recommendation that Australia adopt a US-style system of “fair use” as more important than the recommendation that Australia allow the free import of books.

Removing the remaining restrictions on importing books would cut prices by $25 million. On average books bought in Australia are 20 per cent more expensive than identical titles bought in places such as Britain.

Of the $25 million, $15 million flowed overseas.

“So it’s hard not to view import restrictions as anything but the least effective way to support local authors, and perversely at the expense of local readers,” she said.

“We did listen to the case made by locally based publishers that the additional money they make from import restrictions delivering them higher prices is then used to cross subsidise local authors.”

“We requested this evidence – show us the money. But we were met with the sound of deafening silence.”

However she said of the recommendations before the government, allowing “fair use” was far more important.

“We know with import restrictions that technology, the digital age and new business models have proved a great equaliser. Digital books and real time publishing will continue to discipline the price premium local publishers will extract. So perhaps where we find ourselves today, with import restrictions costing Australian readers around $25 million each year, is about as bad as it will get.”

“The same cannot be said for our system of copyright exceptions. And here’s the policy rub and where the greatest policy imperative looms largest for government. The inequities and costs the present system are growing and will continue to do so with technological and digital advances.”

“Think, no access to data for data mining means no incentive to the workforce to develop those skills ??? skills which other jurisdictions are developing in spades.”

“Think, hampering access to cloud computing means that Australian firms and families are left to use inefficient, antiquated systems in comparison to other markets and countries that can make use of the latest technology.”

“Think, schools and universities not paying $9 million each year for material that is freely available.”

“The Commission heard from Universities Australia about how institutions were reluctant to use material for Massive Open Online Courses because fair dealing might not extend to them.”

“It’s not just about the millions of lost export dollars of our universities. It’s about what’s needed to re-equip our workforce to remain relevant. A university student today will have 17 different jobs. Fair use is a policy lever to avoid the looming education divide of haves and have not’s.”

At present new uses of copyrighted material are presumed to break the law until Parliament gets around to changing it, which took until 2006 in the case of home taping of television programs.

In the United States, Singapore and Israel new uses are permitted on the condition that they are “fair”, taking account of the purpose and nature of the use, how much is used, and whether or not it harms the market for the original work.

The Commission’s report was delivered to the government in September and is with the Industry Minister Arthur Sinodinos.

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‘Doing their job’: Minister defends police for arresting Noosa nudists

Nudists taking part in “Clean up Australia Day”. Being nude on the beach remains illegal in Queensland. Photo: Drew RyanQueensland’s new Police Minister Mark Ryan says police who arrested nude bathers at a Noosa beach were “doing their job”.
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Six nudists have been arrested in 12 months for wilful exposure at Noosa’s Alexandria Bay, prompting the Australian Naturists Federation (ANF) to shift their Nude Olympics from Noosa to Byron Bay.

The beach has long been used for nude bathing, although Queensland remains the only state in Australia which does not officially allow the practice.

Travel website TripAdvisor describes Alexandria Bay, which lies within the Noosa Heads National Park, as “by far Queensland’s most popular nudist beach”.

“(It) has been used for nude swimming and sunbathing for many years,” the site reads.

“Most days there are quite a lot of people on the beach, mostly the southern end, sometimes hundreds on weekends.

“Unfortunately, in spite of many requests, it still does not have legal status.”

The ANF Olympics, a largely social occasion that includes an eight-kilometre marathon, tug of war and egg-throwing events, attracts up to 700 people, and organisers have estimated in the past it adds $2 million to the local economy.

But Mr Ryan said police had responded to complaints by the public.

“I make no apologies for police doing their job,” Mr Ryan said.

“If people break the law they will be arrested,” he said.

“The QPS does not discriminate and will prosecute offenders where it has been established there is sufficient evidence and that any prosecution is in the public interest.”

Mr Ryan declined to respond when asked how Queensland losing a $2 million-a-year tourist venture was in the public interest.

The person who must rule on any changes to Queensland’s nude bathing laws – Attorney General Yvette D’Ath – in December 2016 told the Sunshine Coast Daily she attended nude beaches with her parents “until she was a young adult”.

“As a child, from the age of about 10, my parents would from time to time take our family to nudist beaches,” she said.

“When I was a young adult, I decided I no longer wished to be involved in this activity.”

When asked about the loss of the nudist event to the Noosa economy, Tourism Minister Kate Jones said: “At this stage I am not aware of any significant need for a change in the existing legislation.”

Queensland’s former police minister Bill Byrne came close to explaining the government’s position in April 2016 in state Parliament when he linked nude bathing to Queensland’s wilful exposure legislation.

Two petitions with 1473 signatures calling for change were rejected.

Petitioners wanted a beach “for the recreational use of those who wish to sunbathe or swim nude without the fear of prosecution”.

Then-minister Byrne said Queensland’s wilful exposure laws were “designed to protect citizens and keep them safe”.

“As such, I can advise that the Queensland government has no plans to change the current legislation dealing with wilful exposure.

“Therefore the designation of a clothing-optional beach is not supported at this time.”

On Thursday Fairfax received a response from a government spokesperson which said.” Any request for legislative change would need the broad support of the local community as well as local and state government representatives before it would be considered.”

Tourism Noosa did not return calls from Fairfax Media.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Tom Arnold reveals epic paycheque for brief stint on I’m A Celebrity

Tom Arnold says he earned “$600k, $700k” for his brief stint on Ten’s I’m A Celebrity. Photo: Ten Tom Arnold lazes about on I’m A Celebrity. Photo: Ten
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Here’s some news that might make you quit your job.

Tom Arnold, the Roseanne actor and comedian, has revealed that he was paid up to $700,000 for his two-week stint on Ten’s reality show, I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here!.

The star broke the news on Twitter, responding to a follower who asked what had convinced him to appear on the show, shot in the South African jungle.

“$600k, $700k. Feed fam?” he replied.

Considering the winner of the reality show wins just $100,000 for their chosen charity, it’s a controversial sum.

Following some shocked responses, Arnold later apologised for revealing the info, saying the figure had already been published in local newspapers anyway.

“Jerks brag about salaries… It was already in paper. Still classless move, I’m sorry,” he wrote on Twitter. $600k$700k Feed fam? Out of comfort zone.Scared.Embarrassed Almost did Dancing 2 show son I could.NOT seen in USA LuvedPro,Dir,SaferyGuysNet https://t.co/yhKFK29gSn— Tom Arnold (@TomArnold) February 21, 2017Jerks brag about salaries. Dad told me that so he didn’t have 2 give allowance but It was already in paper. Still classless move. i’m sorry https://t.co/DlqB7iTAdG— Tom Arnold (@TomArnold) February 23, 2017

The actor, the show’s most high-profile name, was the first contestant unceremoniously dumped by viewers, miffed by his grumpy on-set exploits which mainly involved lying in bed and napping.

“It’s the worst thing I’ve ever been through,” he told hosts Chris Brown and Julia Morris, when asked about the experience.

“I didn’t know it was going to be real, or I wouldn’t have signed up for it.” Farewell to the most energetic campmate we’ve ever had. Thanks for the memories Tom! #ImACelebrityAUpic.twitter南京夜网/7wJwnX5hTn— #ImACelebrityAU (@ImACelebrityAU) February 12, 2017This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Fun run launch for a legacy

Running aid: Wagga Takes 2 participant Peter Adams with Annette St Clair announce the launch of Lap the Lake in support of the Amie St Clair Melanoma Trust. Picture: Laura Hardwick
Nanjing Night Net

One Wagga man is using everything from his feet to his voiceto chasesupport forthe renowned Amie St Clair Melanoma Trust.

In addition to his participation at this year’s Wagga Takes 2, Peter Adams is launching the trust’s first annual fun run this month.

Theinaugural event aims to raise awareness for the killer disease that claimed the life of twenty-three year old Amie St Clair in 2009.

Mr Adams said money raised would also provideassistance to those undergoing treatment across the Riverina.

Lap the Lake will hit the startline on Sunday, March 12 andparticipants areinvited to walk or run either five or ten kilometres aroundLake Albert.

Mr Adams saidthe charity was close to his heart and encouraged Wagga families and individuals of all ages and abilitiesto sign up.

“The great thing is all the money raised stays in the region,” Mr Adams said.

“We have a free melanoma nurse who supports patients and famlies going through treatment.”

When Peter and Annette St Clair lost their daughter to melanoma in 2009, they never imagined they would receive such overwhelming support.

Her legacy: The late Amie St Clair with her father Peter and mother Annette St Clair, before the twenty-three-year old lost her cancer battle in 2009.

Mrs St Clair said her heart was warmed after Mr Adamsapproached her to raise money for the namesake charity.

“It’s just another form of wonderful support,” Mrs St Clair said.

“The amount of support our little charity got from this community …it justgives you that warm, fuzzy feeling.”

Visit the Amie St Clair Melanoma Trust or Wagga Takes 2 websites and Facebook pages to register.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Schools and universities charged millions for things that are free

School children work off a computer at Darlington Public School. Photo: Louise KennerleyAustralian schools pay $9 million each year to display web pages that are available freely on the internet. They are even charged for displaying thumbnail images of book covers on their school intranet sites.
Nanjing Night Net

They and other institutions pay another $11 million each year to collection agencies for the display of works whose authors can’t be found, which the agencies then pool and distribute to members who weren’t the authors.

Addressing a copyright forum at the National Library on Friday, the co-chair of the Productivity Commission’s intellectual property inquiry, Karen Chester, said she regarded her recommendation that Australia adopt a US-style system of “fair use” as more important than the recommendation that Australia allow the free import of books.

Removing the remaining restrictions on importing books would cut prices by $25 million. On average books bought in Australia are 20 per cent more expensive than identical titles bought in places such as Britain.

Of the $25 million, $15 million flowed overseas.

“So it’s hard not to view import restrictions as anything but the least effective way to support local authors, and perversely at the expense of local readers,” she said.

“We did listen to the case made by locally based publishers that the additional money they make from import restrictions delivering them higher prices is then used to cross subsidise local authors.”

“We requested this evidence – show us the money. But we were met with the sound of deafening silence.”

However she said of the recommendations before the government, allowing “fair use” was far more important.

“We know with import restrictions that technology, the digital age and new business models have proved a great equaliser. Digital books and real time publishing will continue to discipline the price premium local publishers will extract. So perhaps where we find ourselves today, with import restrictions costing Australian readers around $25 million each year, is about as bad as it will get.”

“The same cannot be said for our system of copyright exceptions. And here’s the policy rub and where the greatest policy imperative looms largest for government. The inequities and costs the present system are growing and will continue to do so with technological and digital advances.”

“Think, no access to data for data mining means no incentive to the workforce to develop those skills ??? skills which other jurisdictions are developing in spades.”

“Think, hampering access to cloud computing means that Australian firms and families are left to use inefficient, antiquated systems in comparison to other markets and countries that can make use of the latest technology.”

“Think, schools and universities not paying $9 million each year for material that is freely available.”

“The Commission heard from Universities Australia about how institutions were reluctant to use material for Massive Open Online Courses because fair dealing might not extend to them.”

“It’s not just about the millions of lost export dollars of our universities. It’s about what’s needed to re-equip our workforce to remain relevant. A university student today will have 17 different jobs. Fair use is a policy lever to avoid the looming education divide of haves and have not’s.”

At present new uses of copyrighted material are presumed to break the law until Parliament gets around to changing it, which took until 2006 in the case of home taping of television programs.

In the United States, Singapore and Israel new uses are permitted on the condition that they are “fair”, taking account of the purpose and nature of the use, how much is used, and whether or not it harms the market for the original work.

The Commission’s report was delivered to the government in September and is with the Industry Minister Arthur Sinodinos.

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This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Fighting for the right to a name

John Rawcliffe, from Unique Manuka Factor in New Zealand says protection of a regional brand is paramount to market success. He is now appealing to Australians to find their own provinance when it comes to branding medical honey.Kiwis are good at holding on to their brand – and especially excellent at making their own name from a foreign product – the famousfruit bearing their moniker being the best case in point.
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Now New Zealand manufacturers of medically proven Manuka honey are in a fightto protect provenance.

John Rawcliffe,Administratorof theUnique Manuka Factor honey association, says each regionalsuppliershould pursue its ‘own journey, with its own names in its own words’. He is concerned that with plantings of proper Leptospermum varieties in China, Taiwan and Portugal, the valuable niche product Manuka will become a commodity and ‘everyone will lose’.

“If we lose the ability to distinguish in the marketplace what is unique to NZ Manuka honey and Australian Jellybush honey we effectively start the process of commoditising,” he says.“This is not an Australia vs New Zealandissue; other countries have already started to plant leptospermum species. One could argue that the Australian honey industry is seeking a short term gain that will ultimately result in a lose-lose.”

Tasmanian apiarists tell a very different story. In the Apple Isle honey fromLeptospermumscopariumhas been called Manuka in print since 1884 and obviously beyond that in conversation. While the word is clearly Polynesian the plant is probably not. In fact University of Sunshine Coast researcher Dr Peter Brook says there is sound evidence to suggest prevailing winds blew seed from Tasmania to New Zealand, same as red dust gets deposited on the glaciers of Mt Cook.

“What are we going to call our honey,” asked Nicola Charles, managing director of Blue Hills Honey at Mawbanna. “We would be extremely concerned if we couldn’t use the word Manuka and we certainly won’t be marketing it as ‘goo bush’.

“We are artisans producing 30 tonnes each year and can’t compete with New Zealand,” she said noting this season was poor with only eight to 10 tonnes in production.

More recently Manuka’s threat wasn’t from another region but from fakers who spruiked ordinary honey as something extraordinary.

In response Unique Manuka Factor commissioned a group of scientists to come up with a chemical fingerprint targeting spikes inLeptosperin, and phenyllactic acids easily read by a hand held ‘Manuka meter’ which now instantly identifiesthe pure product. Faking the brand is no longer an issue.

Leptospermum polygalifolium makes the most productive medical honey on the North Coast but its native colloquil name, Jellybush, hardly makes for inspiring marketing. Manuka is better.

Once was dumped The unusual anti-bacterial and anti-fungal honey was once very little value. For years it was a cursed product with apiarists winging about how the thixotropic goo used to damage equipment during extraction. Now the medical science behind the Manuka’s claims is undeniable and the market has latched on with prices for Manuka honey back to the apiarist in the order of $40/kg. In London shops a 250g jar can retail for the same price.

Dr Peter Brook, University Sunshine Coast, says the Manuka standard should contain at least 100ppm honey from pollen of the Leptospermum bush of which there are 83 species in Australia and only one in New Zealand!

“They all have different properties, he said. “Some are good for anti-bacterial, some are good for anti-inflammatory action.” Currently chromatography is defining the varieties through unique fingerprints.

Prior to the standard, clover honey might be fakedby cooking it until it turned a dark red, like Manuka, before being passed off as the real thing.

The new Manuka standard is actually a ‘floor’ standard with quality products containing much higher levels of activism.

“Bees collect pollen from every flower in a two kilometer radius so the honey is already well mixed,” explained Dr Brook. “But in a good honey flow you can expect about 500ppm Manuka.”

Mr Rawcliffe said the usual test for medicinal honey used peroxide levels with +15 a good example of active jellybush honey. Trouble is that system can be faked with the activity increasing as the honey ages.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

‘Doing their job’: Minister defends police for arresting Noosa nudists

Nudists taking part in “Clean up Australia Day”. Being nude on the beach remains illegal in Queensland. Photo: Drew RyanQueensland’s new Police Minister Mark Ryan says police who arrested nude bathers at a Noosa beach were “doing their job”.
Nanjing Night Net

Six nudists have been arrested in 12 months for wilful exposure at Noosa’s Alexandria Bay, prompting the Australian Naturists Federation (ANF) to shift their Nude Olympics from Noosa to Byron Bay.

The beach has long been used for nude bathing, although Queensland remains the only state in Australia which does not officially allow the practice.

Travel website TripAdvisor describes Alexandria Bay, which lies within the Noosa Heads National Park, as “by far Queensland’s most popular nudist beach”.

“(It) has been used for nude swimming and sunbathing for many years,” the site reads.

“Most days there are quite a lot of people on the beach, mostly the southern end, sometimes hundreds on weekends.

“Unfortunately, in spite of many requests, it still does not have legal status.”

The ANF Olympics, a largely social occasion that includes an eight-kilometre marathon, tug of war and egg-throwing events, attracts up to 700 people, and organisers have estimated in the past it adds $2 million to the local economy.

But Mr Ryan said police had responded to complaints by the public.

“I make no apologies for police doing their job,” Mr Ryan said.

“If people break the law they will be arrested,” he said.

“The QPS does not discriminate and will prosecute offenders where it has been established there is sufficient evidence and that any prosecution is in the public interest.”

Mr Ryan declined to respond when asked how Queensland losing a $2 million-a-year tourist venture was in the public interest.

The person who must rule on any changes to Queensland’s nude bathing laws – Attorney General Yvette D’Ath – in December 2016 told the Sunshine Coast Daily she attended nude beaches with her parents “until she was a young adult”.

“As a child, from the age of about 10, my parents would from time to time take our family to nudist beaches,” she said.

“When I was a young adult, I decided I no longer wished to be involved in this activity.”

When asked about the loss of the nudist event to the Noosa economy, Tourism Minister Kate Jones said: “At this stage I am not aware of any significant need for a change in the existing legislation.”

Queensland’s former police minister Bill Byrne came close to explaining the government’s position in April 2016 in state Parliament when he linked nude bathing to Queensland’s wilful exposure legislation.

Two petitions with 1473 signatures calling for change were rejected.

Petitioners wanted a beach “for the recreational use of those who wish to sunbathe or swim nude without the fear of prosecution”.

Then-minister Byrne said Queensland’s wilful exposure laws were “designed to protect citizens and keep them safe”.

“As such, I can advise that the Queensland government has no plans to change the current legislation dealing with wilful exposure.

“Therefore the designation of a clothing-optional beach is not supported at this time.”

On Thursday Fairfax received a response from a government spokesperson which said.” Any request for legislative change would need the broad support of the local community as well as local and state government representatives before it would be considered.”

Tourism Noosa did not return calls from Fairfax Media.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.