Mechanics lend hand to Walgett farmers

Drought stricken farmers in the Walgett Shire have been given a helping hand, thanks to three NRMA patrol officers who came out to their property to lend their mechanical skills. The patrols, David Scott, Enzo Leto and Joe LaHoud, all from Sydney,volunteeredto assist the farming families in need.
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When the Western Magazine spoke to the patrols last Thursday, they were on the property of Walgett farmer Mark Balderson.

Trip team leader David Scott said the patrols do about 10 trips peryear. Before they came to Walgett they were helping farmers in Lightning Ridge.

“Its been great to spreadthe love.In the two years we’ve been doing this we’ve seen up to 10 farmers,” he said.

Mark said the drought had made things very tough –both financially and mentally -theselast few years, so the NRMA patrols have helped in a big way.

“I’ve been trying to do a fair bit on my own. These last 4 years have been very tough with the drought and I haven’t been able to afford to pay for anything,” he said.

“Soevery bit helps. They’re a nice bunch of guys. Sometimes it feels like the farmers are forgotten out here”

After being in years of drought Mark was able to last year plant 1000 acres of chickpeas.

After so long without any rain or income, things were starting to look up.

But then the rains came. And it was too much rain and Mark lost his crop.

Mechanical help: NRMA patrolman and trip team leader David Scott at one of the Walgett Shire farmer’s property, where he and other patrols lent a helping hand in fixing their machinery. Photo: Youtube

Over a quarter of a million dollars was lost.

“People say you’ll be right but can’t be insured for a flood,” he said.

“I’ve got 4 young children and I’d like to pass something down to them.”

NRMA patrolman JoeLaHoud described coming out to the bush as a“fantastic experience” to help someone in need.

“It’s very rewarding for us,” Joe said.

“We couldn’tof done it without the NRMA board and David.”

Enzo Letoagreed that it had been a rewardingexperience.

“We’ve had a lot of support from out family in coming out here. its very rewarding,” he said.

David, Joe and Enzo spent two days on Mark’s farm helping not only with machinery mechanical work, but they also helped out with mustering sheep and shearing.

They were leaving on the Friday.

Enzo said it was wonderful to not only get the opportunity to experience life on the farm, but to also have the chance to get to know Mark.

“It’ll be emotional for Mark having to say goodbye to us tomorrow … but i think it’ll be emotional for us as well,” he said.

If you would like to find out more information to volunteer or donate please head tohttp://梧桐夜网mynrma南京夜网419论坛/lightningridge

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Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
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‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
Nanjing Night Net

‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

History of migration

The sister-city agreement between Ikeda, Japan and Launceston. November 1, 1965.There has been at least one constant in Tasmania’s history:the migration of people from all over the world to the island state.
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Since settlement, world influences have strongly influenced migration to Tasmania, with global conflicts playinga big role.

In 1803 white settlement of Tasmania began, but not for the reasons you might think.

Britain, who was at the time at war with France, sent people to colonise the state to prevent the French from staking a claim on the territory.

When the war with France ended in 1815 many soldiers struggled to find work in the empire, driving another wave of migration to Van Diemen’s Land.

Free land grants by the government in the 1820s led many to seek their fortunes in the lucky country, where they could establish themselves comfortably.

“These were mainly skilled people who could see that their skills were in demand,” historian Jon Addison said.

Also during this period, many used the convict system as a form of unofficial migration.

“Bear in mind …if you were seriously disenfranchised urban poor, the standard of living here as a convict was probably higher than what you’d left in Britain, particularly in Ireland,” Mr Addison said.

The 1830s saw an influx of Scots, after they were displaced by changes to the way farms were managed by the few powerful families.

Similarly, the potato famine of the 1840s drove many Irish to immigrate, seeking fairer fortunes.

In this era, migrants took about 20 weeks to arrive by boat.

After the abolition of free land grants in 1831, a new system was developed by the Tasmanian government in 1854 to drive skilled migration to the colony, whereby the government assisted migrants with their passage on the condition themigrant either repaid it or worked in the state for two years.

The first significant migration of non-British people was in 1855 when six shiploads of Germans arrived,attracted for skilled labor.

However, with the advent of World War I, the government imprisoned 10 Germans and sent five back to Germany.

At that time many Tasmanian towns that reflected German heritage, such as Bismark, now Collinsvale, were renamed.

Both World War I and World War II drove migration to Tasmania, with people wanted to help build defences, and fill skills shortages in the wake of the population hit suffered in each war.

Hundreds of Italians came to Tasmania after World War I, and following World War, II many Poles and Europeans arrived, often workingon hydro-electric schemes.

More recently, the white Australia policy was lifted in 1972, allowing greater diversity of arrivals in Tasmania.

The 1970s saw the arrival of Asian migrants escaping Vietnam, and most recently one in five arrivals in Tasmania are humanitarian refugees.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Enjoy Macleay’s great facilities

It’s important for our personal and community health and well-being to take time to relax and socialise. In the past week alone, I have received feedback on three separate occasions about the great recreational facilities we have in our valley.
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It made me stop and think that when we’re out and about getting on with our busy lives, we take for granted community gems that are worth appreciating and using to enrich our lives.

I enjoyed watching some great swimming contests at the recent Twilight Meet at the Kempsey McElhone Memorial Pool.

While there a visitor from a neighbouring town – not realising who I was – praised our local pool for its fantastic facilities and surrounds.

I heard similar compliments made about Riverside Park and Kempsey Library for the quality of the services and amenities provided for residents and visitors to our valley to enjoy.

Being healthy is the first of the four goals set out in our Community Strategic Plan that we as a community want to achieve. It’s important for our personal and community health and well-being to take time to relax and socialise.

Our recreational reserves located near our spectacular beaches and hinterland, our four swimming pools and libraries, along with our parks and playgrounds are there for our residents to enjoy and connect with others in our community.

NSW SENIORS FESTIVAL

This year’s Seniors Festival theme – ‘Let’s do more together’ – supports our goals of socialising and connecting with others to stay healthy, especially as we grow older.

Council has fun activities planned for the Seniors Festival being held over the next two weeks. Seniors can come along to the Kempsey Library to brush up on your computer skills or take a yoga class, or if you’re feeling creative, join the ‘Dear Doilies’ stencil art workshops being hosted by artist, Lucy Pascale.

The Seniors Festival is a time to show our appreciation for what seniors contribute to our lives and our community.

It is also an opportunity to encourage all seniors to be active, independent and healthy by spending time with others.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
Nanjing Night Net

‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Help to live with loss

Compassion: Karen Vial and Jan Moore making butterflies for the day seminar being held next month. Photo: Peter Hardin 220217PHB027TAMWORTHwill host its first Compassionate Friends day seminar next month and the group hopesto get the word out to as many people in the region as possible.
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Compassionate Friends is a world-wide organisation that helps people who have lost children or siblings. While the Tamworth branch meets every month, this is the first time they will host a full day seminar with guest speakers.

Tamworth chapter leader, Karen Vial, said the day and the group can be a powerful tool in helping people to learn to live and look after yourself following the deathof a loved one.

“When people come to the group they find that they make friends instantly,feel comfortable and develop instant bonds, as we all have something in common,” Mrs Vial said.

“It can really reinforce that they are not alone and we want them to take away that they will survive and will get through it, regardless of how far along they are in grieving.”

Some members of the local chapter met last week to make decorated butterflies, which are the symbol of the Compassionate Friends, and will be used at the seminar.

“People write the name of their child, or loved one, on the butterfly and a little note and we hang them on a tree,” Mrs Vial said.

Guest speakers on the day will include acclaimed grief author, educator and trainer Doris Zagdanski, who will be doing a presentation titledThe elephant in the room –Why no one will talk about our children,while Linda Campbell will hold a session calledLiving with loss.

There will also be a workshop on mindfulness and caring for yourself.

“We know that unfortunately there are a lot of people around the region that have been affected,” Mrs Vial said.

“People can just sit and listen if they like – just making that move is the first step.”

The seminar will be held at the Frog and Toad from 9am until 5pm, on Saturday March 18. The cost is $20, and that includesall catering as well as lunch.

Bookings are essential. For more information or to book, contact Karen Vial on 0427922714.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Iconic takeaway The Big Red Hen closed after 35 years

Iconic takeaway The Big Red Hen closed after 35 years ICONIC SHOP CLOSES: Sisters Angela Ginis (left) and Helen Waller have closed their The Big Red Hen business after 25 years. Picture: Geoff Jones
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Richmond resident Greg Sheppeard has been eating at The Big Red Hen for 30 years.

Richmond resident Greg Sheppeard has been eating at The Big Red Hen for 30 years.

A 1982 newspaper clipping from Macquarie Towns Review when Jim and Cathy Bacasetas originally opened The Big Red Hen.

Helen Waller (left) and Angela Ginis on their final day of trading.

‘George’ the iconic hen statue will have a new home in the sisters’ Lennox Street residence.

The shopfront is now for lease.

Farewell scrumptious chicken, chips and gravy.

The team’s announcement on The Big Red Hen Facebook page attracted over 400 comments from customers who were sorry to see them go.

Picture: Facebook

Picture: Facebook

Picture: Facebook

TweetFacebookand dinner here. I’m just devastated,” says Richmond resident, Greg Sheppeard.

He’s standing on Windsor Street, Richmond, outside The Big Red Hen, and today is the store’s final day of business.

“Everyone’s been talking about it, up at the Marketplace, everywhere. Twenty five years of coming to the one shop – you weren’t just a customer, you became family,” he says.

Mr Sheppeard, 50, is just one of likely thousands of current and ex-Hawkesbury residents who are sorry to see their beloved local takeaway close its doors.

Two of these residents, who happen to be walking past the store, stop and chat to Mr Sheppeard – it seems they were regulars, too.

“My husband and I were so upset when we heard the news,” says a lady. Like Mr Sheppeard, she has been eating at the establishment for decades.

“Are we all here to commiserate the loss of The Big Red Hen?” says a man. Clearly, that’s what’s happening.

On Facebook, The Big Red Hen page has almost 1300 likes, and the closure announcement posted a few days ago already has over 400 comments.

Some asked for their gravy recipe, and others asked for the name of their chicken croquettes supplier. Even their fruit salad and yoghurt was mentioned as a firm favourite.

Many of the comments shared personal stories about coming into The Big Red Hen, through school and while working. Some were simply passing through the neighbourhood, but it tasted so good that they remembered it, they said.

For Mr Sheappard, The Big Red Hen’s closure is the loss of an institution, and he mentions numerous times how devastated he is.

“I actually cried when I heard the news. So many friendships were made in here,” he says.

Over the past quarter-of-a-century, Mr Sheppeard has sampled the entire menu – many times over. The dish that originally got him hooked, however, was the hot chips and gravy. With chicken salt, of course.

“Lately it’s been fish and chips, but it’s also been schnitzel wraps. It’s been hamburgers. Ohhh and the creamy pasta!” he says.

“You could walk in and they knew exactly what you wanted. They were really on the ball. Nothing compares to this shop, mate. Trust me, it’s the best.”

Richmond resident Greg Sheppeard has been eating at The Big Red Hen for 30 years.

Family businessThe heroes behind all the hype – and arguably the best hot-chip chefs in the Hawkesbury – are sisters and business partners, Angela Ginis and Helen Waller.

Richmond born and bred, the sisters shut the doors on 25 years of memories when they closed The Big Red Hen for the final time.

“It wasn’t an easy decision to make and it wasn’t taken lightly. It’s been very emotional,” Ms Ginis told the Gazette.

“People are devastated. The business has taken on its own entity – it’s like somebody’s died.”

The duo attempted to find a buyer for The Big Red Hen, but none came forward. Their family owns the building, and they are now looking for a lessee for the shopfront – though they are still hoping a white knight will snap-up the business and keep its legacy alive.

“It’s sad no one bought it so The Big Red Hen could carry on for the community,” said Ms Ginis.

Their father, Steve Ginis, originally purchased the shop as a fruit shop in the 1970s. He had arrived in Richmond in 1956 and purchased a home on Lennox Street – which the family still owns.

In 1982, a ‘specialist bbq chicken shop’ opened up the road from Mr Ginis’s fruit shop, under the ownership of husband and wife team, Jim and Cathy Bacasetas. The duo went on to sell the business and it changed hands a couple of times before Mr Ginis acquired it in 1992 and moved it to its current premises.

By this time, Mr Sheppeard had already begun to get ‘hooked’ on The Big Red Hen’s tasty flavours, and he soon began to put in daily appearances at the new location.

The team’s announcement on The Big Red Hen Facebook page attracted over 400 comments from customers who were sorry to see them go.

Community storeWhen Mr Ginis passed away approximately 10 years ago, Ms Ginis and Ms Waller took over the shop’s reigns. His daughters had already been working there for around 15 years, and they knew the family business like the backs of their hands.

“It’s time to do something new now,” said Ms Ginis. She also owns Hawkesbury Natural Therapies Centre, and is studying to become a naturopath.

“We’re really open to whatever’s out there. Life is an adventure! But we’ll still be around the area.”

The sisters and business partners wanted to thank their staff, customers, and suppliers.

“A huge ‘thank you’ to all the staff over the years. They were all dedicated, honest and hardworking, and we would not have been successful without them,” said Ms Ginis.

“We had staff who started when they were 14 – we really enjoyed giving kids their first job, watching them growing up, and then coming into the shop with their own families.

“A huge thank you to our customers, for their dedication and loyalty. And to all our suppliers – we would not have had our success without them.

“We are only two people, and it takes a community to help run a store.”

The iconic hen statue that has resided inside the store for the past 20-odd years – the sisters call the statue ‘George’ – will now go home to live with their family.

Helen Waller (left) and Angela Ginis on their final day of trading.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Peel Cricket Association round 17 previews

Peel Cricket Association round 17 previews TweetFacebookWhite Knights Baldivis v PinjarraLadder position
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Baldivis: Fifth

Pinjarra: Sixth

Short story

A loss in this game would see Pinjarra’s finals ambitions squashed and Baldivis’ hopes severely decrease; it’s really a do-or-die for both sides. On recent form, you give the edge to Pinjarra, but only by an inch. Their last two games saw them defeat Hillman (ninth) and lose to Singleton (first), whereas Baldivis have dropped games to both Hillman and Warnbro (tenth). This game will go to whichever side comes better prepared on the day, but it should be a cracker.

Fixture

Settlers Turf, Saturday, 12.15pm

Mandurah v SingletonLadder position

Mandurah: Fourth

Singleton: First

Short story

For mine, this is the match of the round. Mandurah has to overcome the competition’s most in-form side to keep their grip on a finals spot, while Singleton will be keen to stretch their winning streak to four games. It’s a daunting task, but if Mandurah can overcome the Irwinians and then take down Warnbro next week, they would go into the finals on a three-game winning run and would carry plenty of momentum.

Fixture

Meadow Springs Turf, Saturday, 12.15pm

Hillman v WaroonaLadder position

Hillman: Ninth

Waroona: Second

Short story

Waroona’s win over Shoalwater Bay last week, which came on the back of a few impressive individual efforts, could be considered a statement victory. Taking down a team that was in second place was a big win, and now their two matches before finals are against sides outside the top four. Given their form last week, it’s fair to assume they’ll be in good touch again, but underestimating Hillman could see them slip back to third if they don’t bring their best.

Fixture

Stan Twight East Turf, Saturday, 12.15pm

South Mandurah v Shoalwater BayLadder position

South Mandurah: Seventh

Shoalwater Bay: Third

Short story

South Mandurah’s win over Warnbro kept their slim hopes of playing finals alive last week. Now, they are tasked with a much more difficult opponent to keep their season running. Shoalwater is fighting for second place and a final on their home wicket, and they’re coming off a loss they will be keen to redeem themselves for.

Fixture

Peelwood Turf, Saturday, 12.15pm

Warnbro Swans v Halls HeadLadder position

Warnrbo: Tenth

Halls Head: Eighth

Short story

Neither of these sides will make the finals, but the question now becomes whether or not they can finish the season with a couple more wins under their belt. The Swans got the monkey of their back when they claimed their first win of the season over Baldivis three weeks ago, but they will be eager to finish the season with more than a single victory. This isanother match that has the potential to go either way.

Fixture

Warnbro Turf, Saturday, 12.15pm

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Caution on El Niño forecasts

NOT ALARMED: Wet conditions such as these captured in Victoria last spring are unlikely this year according to early climate forecasts.THE FARMING community has reacted with alarm to media reports on climate forecasters speculating that 2017 could see a return to the El Niño climate conditions that are correlated with drought conditions over much of Australia.
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However, Agriculture Victoria climate agronomist Dale Grey has urged farmers not to press the panic button just yet.

“It is true that a number of climate models have raised the possibility of an El Niño developing in the Pacific, but it is also the case that this is the time of year when forecasters have the lowest amount of skill.”

“Looking at the situation now, you would have to see the trade winds around New Guinea go in reverse and a number of things fall into place, none of which are actually happening right now.”

“It is not to say that it could not happen, just that farmers should recognise the low skill in forecasts from this time of year.”

Mr Grey did acknowledge parts of the Pacific were considerably warmer than last year and said on the balance of evidence around at present it would be unlikely Australia will see another year at near La Niña levels.

“The skill is low, but with what we are seeing with all the models predicting either neutral or El Niño seasons, it does appear if the season is outside the norm it will be on the drier side.

“Having said that, it is not until May that the models start having reasonable skill.”

National Australia Bank (NAB) agribusiness agronomist Phin Ziebell said Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) long-term forecasts raised the possibility of a return to dry conditions.

“While it’s arguably too early to assess the coming season with any certainty, BOM models point to the emergence of El Niño in winter this year, which is associated with hotter and drier conditions in eastern and northern Australia.

“The BOM outlook is unfortunately very different to last year.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.