Support for new network

Wendouree MP Sharon Knight has thrown her support behind the new Ballarat Bus Network despite a series of complaints around the new timetable and the change to bus stops throughout the system.
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Backing the services: Wendouree MP Sharon Knight, Buninyong MP Geoff Howard and PTV chief executive Jeroen Weimar at the network unveiling in December last year. Picture: Kate Healy.

The new network which was unveiled on January 31 consolidated the region’s 19 bus routes into 15, with services boosted on the remaining lines to provide an average of one bus every half an hour.

In the weeks since the network was unveiled residents from a number of suburbs including Golden Point, Wendouree and Lake Gardens have expressed concern at the new arrangements.

Ms Knight said while there had been some negative feedback in the wake of the roll-out, the reaction was inevitable given the magnitude of the changes. Public Transport Victoria and the state government also added 10 V/Line train services to and from Melbourne.

“There has been a mixed response but it’s a huge changeand the bus system hadn’t been reviewed in a long time so we knew it was going to be a big job,” Ms Knight said.

“We knew we needed to get more trains to thestation for commuters and we need to service that with more buses and there’s whole areas not even being serviced by the existing bus service.”

Ms Knight and Buninyong MP Geoff Howard will meet with PTV on Tuesday to discuss some of the complaints which have been made about the new system.

The Bus stop placement in Humffray Street near the corner of Water Street, connectivity to Central Square and the route connecting Wendouree to Ballarat North were among the issues which had been raised.

Ms Knight said she had been in regular dialogue with PTV and Public Transport Minister Jacinta Allan since the service was unveiled at the end of January and was confident some of the faults could be ironed out in the coming months.

“We have already sent through a list of common complaints we are getting and we have also got a meeting with CDC planned because I want the perspective of the bus drivers who are ina great position to help us.”

The changes to the network have led to the creation of 36 new driver jobs due increase in services. Thirteen new buses were also built in Victoria to accommodate for the increase in traffic.

“CDCBallarat has created a significant boost to the local economy through employing 36 new staff to date as a direct result of the Ballarat Bus Network Upgrade,” A CDC spokesperson said. “The spread includes bus drivers, mechanics and operations staff.”

A PTV spokesperson said “The new bus network has been informed in consultation with the Ballarat community who overwhelmingly called for more direct routes with more frequent services and better connections with trains”.

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Tassie’s new side backs in ANL title win

QUICK HANDS: Cavaliers centre Shelby Miller passes off during a training drill in Launceston ahead of the Tasmanian Magpies’ ANL season. Picture: Scott GelstonStar Tasmanian Shelby Miller said the state’s new-look Magpies entity believe they can snare the Australian Netball Leaguepremiership in its inaugural season.
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The Launceston centre said the rookie teamis riding confidence ahead of facing Queensland Fusion after its season openeragainst the seven-time ANL winners.

While all the talk in the national media has been about Collingwood Magpies’ premiership favouritism for the maiden Super Netball title, Tasmania’s new netball side exceededexpectations in their debut appearance.

The state’s Magpies that included five Victorians for Collingwood’s feeder side delivered justVictoria Fury’s second defeatsince 2012.

“We stated at one of our team meetings before we played any games about goal-setting that our goal was all about winning the premiership,” Miller said.

“So I think in every game, no matter who you play, you have to go in expecting to win.If you’re not expecting to win that your mindset is not of a winning team.

“We definitely expected to do well and win that game.”

Miller, while studying year 11, last played ANL for Tassie Spirit in 2014 before heading ona hiatus to focus on study during the side’s last season.

FULL STRETCH: Shelby Miller finding it hard to keep her feet on the ground during training ahead of the Tasmanian Magpies’ ANL season. Picture: Scott Gelston.

Though Tasmanian Magpies dropped their second game the next day against the Fury, Miller said coach Jon Fletcher has convinced the girls of the right mentality before runningout on court.

“We talked about how they were the benchmark team of the competition; now we decided we’ve made ourselves the benchmark team of the competition,” she said.

“We can now build on that and hopefully other teams feel we are the benchmark.”

The Cavaliers 19-year-old said the Magpies shouldbe better prepared for the weekend’s second-leg in Brisbane against theQueenslanders.

Both sides are allowed to bring down unplayed Super Netball players from overnight for Sunday’s game.

“As our coach always says, it’s always two different games on each day; the team can vary a lot like it varied last week,” Miller said.

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PHOTOS| Central west students build their interest in merino industry

Trangie Central School students Jacana Powell, Demi Dunn and Abbie Fraser. Photo: Taylor JurdIncreasing students knowledge of the merino industry and giving them the opportunity to explore the agricultural industrywas the aim of the School Wethers Challenge.
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Held at the Dubbo TAFE campus along Narromine Road, on Monday, February 20, the students and their agricultural teachers were split into four groups which focuses on wool, nutrition, breeding and an industry overview.

Over 200 students from across the central west took part in the challenge.

This was the first time Tullamore Central School have participated in the School Wethers Challenge andagriculture teacher Natasha Shankelton said taking part would give her students a lot more exposure to merino wool and the meat industry.

“It’s our first year in the Challenge and it’s just a great opportunity to be a part of,” she said.

PHOTOS| Central west students build their interest in merino industry Gilgandra High School Ellanorah Matthews, Aysha Tobin, Mitchell Carlow, Matthew Coddington, Rabobank National Merino Show and Sale president. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston

Gilgandra High School Andrew Dinsey, Connor Whiteman, YR 11. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston.

Forbes High School Tye Stewart, Vanessa Cole, Mitchell Jack, Jack Piercy, Jack Hodges-Lockwood. Photo: Gabrielle Johnstone.

Greg Sawyer, AWN, Condobolin High School Kenny Dodds, Cameron Charles, Clifford Lanyerie, Dave White, teacher Anne Farney. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston

Macquarie Anglican Grammar School, Dubbo, Abbey Cusack, Jenni Tink, Angus Bodlan, Brett Cooper, AWN. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston

Gunnedah High School, left, Haylee Murrell, Lucy Moore, Helena Pease, front right, Philip Tydd, agriculture assistant. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston

Red Bend Catholic College, Matthew Mitton, Oliver Squire, Clinton Hooper, Hugh Squire, Grace Frazer. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston

Tullamore Central School Jack Darcy, Angus Porter, Lachlan Curr. Photo: Gabrielle Johnston

Trangie Central School students Jacana Powell, Demi Dunn and Abbie Fraser. Photo: Taylor Jurd

Gilgandra High Scool students Robyn Holland, Tianna Watt and Shanae Shepherd. Photo: Taylor Jurd

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Epilepsy Awareness for Purple Day

Epilepsy in focus: Local resident Tania Leadbitter is advocating for awareness and understanding of epilepsy. Photo: Shannon Wood. Local resident Tania Leadbitteris raising awareness for Epilepsy in conjunction with Epilepsy Awareness month and Purple Day on March 26.
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After a recent seizure she suffered in public left her helpless on the side of the road, Ms Leadbitter decided to advocate for awareness in the community for people to better understand the condition.

Ms Leadbitter, who does not usually go out alone in public due to her epilepsy, decided to walk to a friends house on a Friday morning last month.

The next thing she knew, she had collapsed andfound herself suffering from a lengthy seizureon the side of the road.

“I don’t usually walk anywhere, I just happened to be walking across the road at that time, unluckily,” she said.

“I don’t have the type of seizure where you lay on the ground and shake, I just blank out.

“People think of epilepsy as being on the ground shaking, when that’s not always the case.”

A friend of Ms Leadbitter, who did not wish to be named, happened to be driving past during the incident and witnessed several people driving past without offering assistance to Ms Leadbitter.

“As I came along to where Wallsend Street splits into two, Tania was sitting on the road side.

A lady backed out of the driveway a bit further up and had a good look at herand then drove away,” he said. “About four cars actually slowed down and went around her.

Then when I pulled up on the kerb to talk to her and try and get her in the caranother few cars slowed down and went through, no one stopped to see if she was alright.

“I realise a lot of people are worried now, with all the drug addicts and things like that, but you can stop and wind your window down and ask if someone is alright.”

Ms Leadbitter, who has lived in Collie for 30 years, said people should be more caring when it comes to strangers and asking if they need help.

“I just want people to be more aware, I wasn’t a drug addict lying on the road,” she said.

Ms Leadbitter is currently on a waiting list for an operation that could potentially cure her epilepsy.

For more information about Epilepsy Awareness month go toepilepsyaustralia.net.

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Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
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‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
Nanjing Night Net

‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

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A winning summer for reading

Back row, from left: Vicki Edmunds (Blue Mountains Library Manager), Sophie Connor, Jacinta Hanemann, Deputy Mayor Cr Chris Van Der Kley, Cr Romola Hollywood, Annie Sharkey and Alan Crooks (Turning Page Bookshop). Front row, from left: Heidi Hanemann, Thomas Hanemann, Natasha Thompson, and Abigail Dickens.The Blue Mountains’ keenest readers were announced this week following the end of the Blue Mountains Library Summer Reading Challenge for 2016/17.
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This year’s challenge saw an impressive 563 childrenparticipate, reading 11,220 books.

Deputy mayor Chris Van der Kley and Cr Romola Hollywood took delight in giving prizesto four keen winners: best junior reader – Abigail Dickens; best teen reader – Sophie Connor; encouragement award – Natasha Thompson; and best family readeraward – the Hanemann Family.

Blue Mountains branch libraries wereinundated in the last twomonths with children and teenagers borrowing books consistently. Library staff enjoyed the excitement as childrenreturned log sheets in exchange for book vouchers redeemable from The Turning Page Bookshop in Springwood and Megalong Books in Leura.

Cr Van ker Kleysaid the Blue Mountains Library continues to create an exciting environment for children, “helping to instil the habit of reading and a thirst for knowledge which makes children open to new ideas throughout their lives”.

Over the past nineyears the program has seen 80,130 books borrowed for the Summer Reading Challenge with 4467 children participating.

Cr Romola Hollywood said:“I congratulate all the children and young people who took part in the Summer Reading Challenge. As the Vice-President (Metropolitan) of the NSW Public Libraries Association, this program is a terrific example of how our council libraries provide opportunities for all community members, including our youngest citizens, toexperience the benefits and joys of reading.

“If the statistics from this program areanything to go by, support for our public libraries has a strong future.”

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Col’s eye-catching van

ARTY: Bus owner Col Ward watches as artist Lisa Wiseman puts the finishing touches on the artwork.Col Ward always wanted a tiger painted on the door of his motorhome andnow he has a whole African jungle travelling along with him.
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His Toyota Coaster bus isa moving work of art, emblazoned with around 50 animals including big cats, elephants, antelopes, crocodiles, a giraffe, a rhinoceros,penguins, turtles, meerkats anda bat colony.

The work has created a steady flow of interest from passersby driving past Col’s Eloiza Street with the bus parked out the front.

Local residents have been charting the progress of Dungog artistLisa Wiseman who has been lovingly labouring on the project for the past 11 months.

Col said he had been chasing a man to do the tiger painting on the door for some time before a friend mentioned Lisa who was also Col’s friend and operates her studio Cerublu from Dowling Street.

Lisa is no stranger to designing artwork on vehicles, having worked on a number of caravans and cars.

“I think Lisa thoughtit would be a nice simple little job and then it just went on from the tiger,” laughed Col.

“It’s just spectacular.

“I’m so happy with it.”

Lisa said she and Col would discuss each stage during the project of transforming the chocolate brown bus.

“The weather has been a bit difficult at times so I went sometimes for weeks being able to paint but other days Idid four days a week,” said Lisa.

“I’ve nicknamed it the Sistine Catbus as I’ve spent so much time up on trestles and I don’t really like being up in the air.”

While Col and Lisa have almost lost count of the menagerie on the bus, there are 19 big cats alone on the exterior and another four painted inside, including a snow tiger on the refrigerator.

Each scene is its own story and the more you look at the bus the more animals you see.

Each of the cats’ eyes follow you when you move.

“The eyes of the cats have been painted in gold leaf so they shine off the car lights so it is pretty impressive at night, with the driver behind me having a catstaring at them,” said Col.

Col plans to travel in his newly completed work of art and is keen to see the impressions from other travelers.

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Mechanics lend hand to Walgett farmers

Drought stricken farmers in the Walgett Shire have been given a helping hand, thanks to three NRMA patrol officers who came out to their property to lend their mechanical skills. The patrols, David Scott, Enzo Leto and Joe LaHoud, all from Sydney,volunteeredto assist the farming families in need.
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When the Western Magazine spoke to the patrols last Thursday, they were on the property of Walgett farmer Mark Balderson.

Trip team leader David Scott said the patrols do about 10 trips peryear. Before they came to Walgett they were helping farmers in Lightning Ridge.

“Its been great to spreadthe love.In the two years we’ve been doing this we’ve seen up to 10 farmers,” he said.

Mark said the drought had made things very tough –both financially and mentally -theselast few years, so the NRMA patrols have helped in a big way.

“I’ve been trying to do a fair bit on my own. These last 4 years have been very tough with the drought and I haven’t been able to afford to pay for anything,” he said.

“Soevery bit helps. They’re a nice bunch of guys. Sometimes it feels like the farmers are forgotten out here”

After being in years of drought Mark was able to last year plant 1000 acres of chickpeas.

After so long without any rain or income, things were starting to look up.

But then the rains came. And it was too much rain and Mark lost his crop.

Mechanical help: NRMA patrolman and trip team leader David Scott at one of the Walgett Shire farmer’s property, where he and other patrols lent a helping hand in fixing their machinery. Photo: Youtube

Over a quarter of a million dollars was lost.

“People say you’ll be right but can’t be insured for a flood,” he said.

“I’ve got 4 young children and I’d like to pass something down to them.”

NRMA patrolman JoeLaHoud described coming out to the bush as a“fantastic experience” to help someone in need.

“It’s very rewarding for us,” Joe said.

“We couldn’tof done it without the NRMA board and David.”

Enzo Letoagreed that it had been a rewardingexperience.

“We’ve had a lot of support from out family in coming out here. its very rewarding,” he said.

David, Joe and Enzo spent two days on Mark’s farm helping not only with machinery mechanical work, but they also helped out with mustering sheep and shearing.

They were leaving on the Friday.

Enzo said it was wonderful to not only get the opportunity to experience life on the farm, but to also have the chance to get to know Mark.

“It’ll be emotional for Mark having to say goodbye to us tomorrow … but i think it’ll be emotional for us as well,” he said.

If you would like to find out more information to volunteer or donate please head tohttp://梧桐夜网mynrma南京夜网419论坛/lightningridge

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Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
Nanjing Night Net

‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Illegal ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals are ‘Not Our Way’Video

The NSW Police have launched a new campaign in Dubbo aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of illegal drug use in Aboriginal communities across the state.
Nanjing Night Net

‘Not Our Way’ has been developed by the NSW Police Drug and Alcohol Coordination team in conjunction with Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (ACLOs), key health industry stakeholders as well as local Aboriginal elders and community members.

The campaign consists of dual videos that address the rising issue of methylamphetamine (‘ice’), the illegal use of pharmaceuticals, and the associated health and safety risks to both individuals’ and the wider community.

Additional educational resources – including youth-focused story books as well as brochures on health services that specialise in drug and alcohol recovery support – have been created as part of the campaign.

NSW Police Corporate Sponsor on Aboriginal Communities, Assistant Commissioner Geoff McKechnie, said the campaign aims to highlight and address the challenges facing local Aboriginal communities.

“Research shows that Aboriginal communities are at greater risk of developing harmful long-term drug use than the general population, and both ‘ice’ and pharmaceuticals have shown the biggest spike more recently,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The use and distribution of illegal drugs is not only against the law but it’s incredibly harmful to your health and can lead to many serious consequences including the breakdown of families and local communities.

“The rise in recreational pharmaceutical usage also shows that drugs don’t have to be illegal to be lethal and they can prove to be just as dangerous as their illicit counterparts,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“Both trends are of great concern so we’ve decided to get on the front foot and work with the Aboriginal community to address these specific challenges together, before people are faced with possible jail time and serious health effects.”

Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said the campaign seeks to educate people on the dangers of ‘ice’ and illegal pharmaceutical use by discussing their short and long-term effects while illustrating warning signs for friends and families of those possibly affected.

“Importantly, this is an initiative for and by Aboriginal people – it’s absolutely crucial that we work closely with one another to foster relationships and build stronger, safer communities that acknowledge key challenges while working collaboratively on solutions,” Assistant Commissioner McKechnie said.

“The campaign videos also feature two individuals who speak candidly about their path to recovery and their associated experiences. Our hope is that their voices transect the community and let people know that help and support is available.

“Following today’s launch the campaign resources will be progressively rolled out across the state to send a positive message on behalf of the community that dangerous drug use is ‘Not Our Way.’

Members of the community can contact ADIS at any time for confidential information, advice and referral services.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

History of migration

The sister-city agreement between Ikeda, Japan and Launceston. November 1, 1965.There has been at least one constant in Tasmania’s history:the migration of people from all over the world to the island state.
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Since settlement, world influences have strongly influenced migration to Tasmania, with global conflicts playinga big role.

In 1803 white settlement of Tasmania began, but not for the reasons you might think.

Britain, who was at the time at war with France, sent people to colonise the state to prevent the French from staking a claim on the territory.

When the war with France ended in 1815 many soldiers struggled to find work in the empire, driving another wave of migration to Van Diemen’s Land.

Free land grants by the government in the 1820s led many to seek their fortunes in the lucky country, where they could establish themselves comfortably.

“These were mainly skilled people who could see that their skills were in demand,” historian Jon Addison said.

Also during this period, many used the convict system as a form of unofficial migration.

“Bear in mind …if you were seriously disenfranchised urban poor, the standard of living here as a convict was probably higher than what you’d left in Britain, particularly in Ireland,” Mr Addison said.

The 1830s saw an influx of Scots, after they were displaced by changes to the way farms were managed by the few powerful families.

Similarly, the potato famine of the 1840s drove many Irish to immigrate, seeking fairer fortunes.

In this era, migrants took about 20 weeks to arrive by boat.

After the abolition of free land grants in 1831, a new system was developed by the Tasmanian government in 1854 to drive skilled migration to the colony, whereby the government assisted migrants with their passage on the condition themigrant either repaid it or worked in the state for two years.

The first significant migration of non-British people was in 1855 when six shiploads of Germans arrived,attracted for skilled labor.

However, with the advent of World War I, the government imprisoned 10 Germans and sent five back to Germany.

At that time many Tasmanian towns that reflected German heritage, such as Bismark, now Collinsvale, were renamed.

Both World War I and World War II drove migration to Tasmania, with people wanted to help build defences, and fill skills shortages in the wake of the population hit suffered in each war.

Hundreds of Italians came to Tasmania after World War I, and following World War, II many Poles and Europeans arrived, often workingon hydro-electric schemes.

More recently, the white Australia policy was lifted in 1972, allowing greater diversity of arrivals in Tasmania.

The 1970s saw the arrival of Asian migrants escaping Vietnam, and most recently one in five arrivals in Tasmania are humanitarian refugees.

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Enjoy Macleay’s great facilities

It’s important for our personal and community health and well-being to take time to relax and socialise. In the past week alone, I have received feedback on three separate occasions about the great recreational facilities we have in our valley.
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It made me stop and think that when we’re out and about getting on with our busy lives, we take for granted community gems that are worth appreciating and using to enrich our lives.

I enjoyed watching some great swimming contests at the recent Twilight Meet at the Kempsey McElhone Memorial Pool.

While there a visitor from a neighbouring town – not realising who I was – praised our local pool for its fantastic facilities and surrounds.

I heard similar compliments made about Riverside Park and Kempsey Library for the quality of the services and amenities provided for residents and visitors to our valley to enjoy.

Being healthy is the first of the four goals set out in our Community Strategic Plan that we as a community want to achieve. It’s important for our personal and community health and well-being to take time to relax and socialise.

Our recreational reserves located near our spectacular beaches and hinterland, our four swimming pools and libraries, along with our parks and playgrounds are there for our residents to enjoy and connect with others in our community.

NSW SENIORS FESTIVAL

This year’s Seniors Festival theme – ‘Let’s do more together’ – supports our goals of socialising and connecting with others to stay healthy, especially as we grow older.

Council has fun activities planned for the Seniors Festival being held over the next two weeks. Seniors can come along to the Kempsey Library to brush up on your computer skills or take a yoga class, or if you’re feeling creative, join the ‘Dear Doilies’ stencil art workshops being hosted by artist, Lucy Pascale.

The Seniors Festival is a time to show our appreciation for what seniors contribute to our lives and our community.

It is also an opportunity to encourage all seniors to be active, independent and healthy by spending time with others.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.